import repository from arizona
[raven.git] / webpage / filelist.html
1 <html>
2 <head>
3 <title> Stork Project </title>
4 <LINK href="stork.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
5
6 </head>
7
8 <body>
9
10
11 <div class="display" align="center">
12         <table border="0">
13         <tr>
14                 <td width="170" valign="top">
15
16                                 <br/>
17                                 <table cellpadding="3" width="170" id="links" class="links">
18                                         <tr>
19                                                 <td align="right">
20
21                                                         <ul class="links">
22                                                         
23                                                                 <a href = "index.html"><h3>Stork</h3></a>
24                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="tutmain.html">Stork Tutorial</a></li>
25
26                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="advanced.html">Advanced Usage</a></li>
27                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="arch.html">Stork Architecture</a></li>
28                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="filelist.html">Stork File List</a></li>
29                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="about.html">About Us</a></li>
30                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="apps.html">Related Links</a></li>
31                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="contact.html">Contact Stork</a></li>
32                                                                 <h4>Links</h4>
33                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="http://appmanager.berkeley.intel-research.net/plcontrol/apps.php?appid=1029">
34                                                                 Slice Status</a></li>
35                                                                 <li class="links"><a href="https://stork-repository.cs.arizona.edu">Stork Repository</a></li>
36                                                         </ul>
37
38                                                  </td>
39                                         </tr>
40                                 </table>
41                                 <br/>
42                 </td>
43                 <td valign="top">
44                 <table class="info" cellpadding="0" width="700" >
45                 <tr  height="75"><td colspan="3"><img style="margin-left: -0px;" src="images/stork-header.png" alt="stork logo"/></td></tr>
46                 <tr  bgcolor="#444444" class="headerrow" width="100%" height="2">
47
48                         <th colspan="2"> Stork File List </th>
49
50                 </tr>
51                 <tr valign="top" align="left">
52
53                         <td>
54                                 <table cellpadding="8" id="content" class="content">
55                                         <tr>
56                                                 <td>
57
58                                                         <h1><a name = "top"></a>Stork Files</h1>
59                                                         The following is a list of Stork files you may need to manage, and how they are used.
60
61                                                         <p><b>Packages:</b> Stork currently supports two types of packages: RPMs and Tarballs.
62                                                         RPMs are generally used for more complex installations, when the package needs to be
63                                                         installed in a directory outside of root. In the case of RPM installation, the scripts
64                                                         associated with the RPM will be run.
65                                                         <br>Stork also supports the transfer of zipped tarball packages. These packages can be
66                                                         created from the command line using the command
67                                                         <code>tar --czf packagename.tar.gz myfolder</code>
68                                                         Stork also supports the inclusion of scripts with your tarball packages. These scripts
69                                                         will be run before or after installation or removal, depending on the file (.preinstall, .postinstall,
70                                                         .preremove and .postremove). We suggest these scripts are used for simple commands; for more
71                                                         complex scripting, you should use an RPM package.
72
73                                                         <p><b>Publickeys and Privatekeys:</b> The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_key_cryptography">
74                                                         public key cryptography</a> system is in place to ensure that the files you recieve are the files
75                                                         you think they are. The combination encryption-signature-hash system guarantees that malicious users
76                                                         cannot infect your system by masquerading as a trusted user or a trusted package. You will need to upload
77                                                         your publickey to the Stork repository so that it can be associated with your nodes; this allows you
78                                                         to manage nodes without having to log into each node separately. You will need a user's
79                                                         publickey to add them to your Trusted Package File (discussed below). This key should
80                                                         be obtained through the user directly, not through Stork.
81
82                                                         <p><b>Configuration File:</b> The Stork configuration file allows you to configure Stork to your personal needs. The
83                                                         default configuration file is included in the <a href="downloads/stork-enduser-tar-latest.tar.gz">Stork enduser tarball</a>.
84                                                         This file is initially named "sample-stork.conf". The file
85                                                         needs to be modified to match your default username. To do this, open up the file and change the line
86                                                         that reads "username = " to read "username = <i>myusername</i>", where <i>myusername</i> is the username
87                                                         you set as your default (you can do this using storkutil and the command <i>setdefault myusername</i>, or
88                                                         Storkutil will do it automatically when generating your first keys). You will also need to modify the
89                                                         publickey line, so that it reads "publickeyfile = /usr/local/stork/var/keys/myusername.publickey"
90                                                         instead of "default.publickey." This will allow Stork to find
91                                                         the locations of your keyfile, so you won't need to specify it when using Storkutil. Note that if you
92                                                         create a new TPFile or new keys, you will need to modify the config file to reflect this.
93
94                                                         <a name="tpfile"></a><p><b>Trusted Packages File(TPFILE):</b> The Trusted Packages File (TPFILE) defines which files you trust
95                                                         to be installed on your nodes. The TPFile allows you to take your node's security into your own hands,
96                                                         and specifically choose which users and packages you trust to install on your node.
97                                                         This helps your nodes stay secure, as files will be
98                                                         verified through a set of cryptographic hash codes. Even if
99                                                         two files share the same name, your nodes will only recieve the one that
100                                                         matches the hash obtained when the Trusted Packages File was created; in short, you will only recieve
101                                                         the packages you trust, regardless of if a user uploads a package with the same name, but different
102                                                         contents.
103                                                         <br>The TPFile also allows users to be trusted.
104                                                         This will let your nodes
105                                                         download and install applications created by other users. When adding a user
106                                                         to your TPFile, you also add the packages you wish this to affect. In some cases, you may
107                                                         want to only trust the user concerning a single package; in other cases, you may want to
108                                                         trust the user regarding <i>any</i> package. See the
109                                                         <a href="doctp.html">Storkutil documentation</a> for more information.
110                                                         Trusting users serves two purposes. For one, it allows you to
111                                                         quickly trust a number of packages. If there are a plethora of packages needing to be installed,
112                                                         it can be quicker to simply add the creator of these packages to your TPFile than to add
113                                                         each individual package.
114                                                         Second, it trusts knowledge of the package to the person who knows it best:
115                                                         the creator. For instance, to always make sure you have the up-to-date version of
116                                                         Stork, you would add Stork to your trusted users list. This is essentially
117                                                         telling Stork to ask the trusted user what to do about the package in question.
118                                                         <br>The TPFile will be created when trying to add a package or user to it,
119                                                         if there is not already one made. When created, the 'default' user is added
120                                                         to your trusted list. This default user trusts Stork and PlanetLab, as well
121                                                         as a few other packages, meaning you should be able to install
122                                                         the newest Stork and PlanetLab releases without adding them to your
123                                                         TPFile. You are also allowed to trust other users, allowing your nodes
124                                                         to accept packages from those users exclusively. Note that adding packages to
125                                                         your TPFILE will not download the packages; it just notifies Stork which packages
126                                                         you trust to be downloaded.
127
128                                                         <p><b>Pacman Groups File:</b> The groups.pacman file allows you to organize your nodes into specific groups
129                                                         in order to install packages quickly to multiple nodes. If there is a package you wish
130                                                         to install on many nodes, you may group these nodes together and then
131                                                         instruct Stork to install the package on the group. Doing this will install the package on all these nodes.
132                                                         If, instead, you wish to install packages manually using Stork, you may also do this.
133                                                         If this is case, you need not create Pacman files. However, if you manage a large number of nodes, using Pacman is a great way
134                                                         to install to multiple nodes with minimal effort. Pacman can also be set to automatically update
135                                                         preexisting packages, according to the package creator's discretion.
136                                                         See the <a href="docpac.html">Storkutil documentation</a>
137                                                         for specific instructions. Note that the groups.pacman file will need to be uploaded via the <a href="https://stork-repository.cs.arizona.edu">repository</a> for it to have effect.
138
139                                                         <p><b>Pacman Packages File:</b> The packages.pacman file works in conjuction with the groups.pacman file.
140                                                         While the Pacman Groups file organizes nodes into groups, the Pacman Packages file tells Stork which packages
141                                                         should be installed on these groups. Again, you will not need to create a Pacman Packages file if
142                                                         you plan to use Stork to manually install packages on a node. Normally, though, you will want to manage your packages over many nodes, making manual installation tedious. To use Pacman to manage your packages, you will need to <a href="docpac.html">create</a> and
143                                                         <a href="https://stork-repository.cs.arizona.edu">upload</a> the packages.pacman file
144                                                         along with the groups.pacman file.
145
146                                                         <center><a href = "index.html">Home</a>     <a href = "#top">Top</a></center>
147
148
149                                                 </td>
150                                         </tr>
151                                 </table>
152                         </td>
153                 </tr>
154
155        </table>
156        </td>
157
158      </tr>
159      <tr>
160         <td></td>
161         <td>
162                 <a href="http://www.planet-lab.org"><img style="border: 0px; border-style: none;" src="images/powered_by_pl_grey.png" alt="powered by planetlab"></a>
163
164                                         <a href="http://www.cs.arizona.edu"><img style="position:relative; left: 20px; border: 0px; border-style: none;" src="images/template_logo_small_grey.png" alt="University of Arizona, Computer Science logo"></a>
165
166
167
168
169
170         </td>
171      </tr>
172
173 </table>
174
175 </div>
176
177
178 <script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript">
179 </script>
180 <script type="text/javascript">
181 _uacct = "UA-1868232-1";
182 urchinTracker();
183 </script>
184 </body>
185 </html>
186
187